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(Last Updated On: June 7, 2018)

 

I see similarities among those that take part in online money-making. A lot of them are trying to build personal funds, and have come across some opportunities that they believe will change their financial status. Some will see a true business idea along the way and spark an entrepreneurial pursuit. Unlike those that may have studied business, they are much more likely to believe that they have to do absolutely everything themselves.

Whether your first business pursuit is a monetised YouTube channel, reselling on eBay or creating affiliate sites, it’s likely that you’re juggling a lot of tasks. After all, if you’re going to get anywhere with it, you’re going to have to put a lot of work in. This is going to be true no matter what you’re making your money from. After all, building a business is – in more cases than not – a lot more difficult than getting a job.

Solopreneurship has a lot of benefits to it, the main one being that you can often work from wherever you want, flexibly, at your own pace. To those that got into it by developing a hobby into a revenue-generating entity, it makes sense that you would be the one developing and executing all of the tasks required for it. You may get a little help at home, but it’s generally all you. I definitely fell into this category. It took a long time to realise that if I’m going to advance – mainly to get the chance to do more projects at once – I have to delegate.

Outsourcing is the single biggest key to solopreneurship. It’s the difference maker that gives you the work-life balance that every lifestyle business owner desires. What good is it working from home if you’re working every spare minute you have? Once you’re confident that the thing you’re pursuing is bringing back a decent profit (or you can dip into your own pocket to kickstart something) make an investment for someone else to do the things you’d rather not.

So how do you decide what tasks to outsource and what to do yourself? Start with what you’re not particularly good at. I gave up on graphic design a long time ago. The days of creating my own logos for projects has passed, and I’m so much better for it. A weekend-long task for me is now something I can brief in 10 minutes and get amazing results for in 2-4 days. I may have to pay for it, but the cost is nothing compared to the time I would have wasted trying to find fonts, fix gradients and clean up edges.

There are so many things like that – some that I need a lot more frequently – that I pay others to handle, so I can concentrate on business development and free up brain space for creativity. You wouldn’t believe how much admin I create for my businesses and projects. It makes sense to offload most of that to others, so I can focus on things that will generate money.

So where do you find people that you can rely on to delegate work to? My favourite sites for finding the perfect freelance talent are People Per Hour and Fiverr. Eventually, you want to work up to the point where you can deal with these people – especially virtual assistants – away from hub sites, so you can work out beneficial deals for regular work. That’s when you may feel better about entrusting them to work on more sensitive parts of your business.

When I left my job, I thought I would need to outsource less, because I got my time back. In fact, I’m investing even more to get others to do the things I haven’t got the time to. To get to this point, I had been spending more on tools that cut out manual processes. The next step is to offload more to other people (that I’ve trialled and I can trust) to ensure that things are running smoothly.

I’m still miles from where I want to be, but seeing more delegation tasks on my Trello than actual ones for me shows I’ve come a long way.

Think it’s time you started hunting for outsourced help? A quick browse on People Per Hour and it’ll be hard to resist.

 

 


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- Chiino

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